Media

Las lavadoras y el medio acuático (8 January 2017)

Washing clothing items made of polyester or nylon releases an enormous amount of fibers that get to waste water treatment plants and cannot be filtered. Therefore, they end up in the sea. The Mermaids Life+ project counted 1,000,000 fibers from polyester fleece, 136,000 fibers from a pair of nylon socks and 300,000 from acrylic scarfs.

Katalat Pienet Mikrokuidut (16 December 2016)

microplastcis_fibres_1024_0The Finnish online magazine Huililehti talks about the problem of microplastics like microbeads and microfibers and the need to look for solutions to the issue, referencing the work of Mermaids Life+.

Investigation Into Ocean-Harming Microfibres Launched (14 December 2016)

Eunomia Research & Consulting has estimated that 190 thousand tonnes of microplastics from textiles enter the world’s marine ecosystem every year, and fashion companies and other members of the textile industry have been called upon by Dutch fashion line G-Star and the PSF to address plastic microfibres. According to the PSF, the machine-washing of clothes is a big source of plastic pollution in oceans, with small plastic fibres – microfibres – shed by synthetic garments being washed through water treatment plants into waterways.

O pesadelo da roupa limpa (16 October 2016)

After Plymouth University showing that 700,000 microfibers are released into the environment every time we wash our clothes, Projecto Colabora introduces different solutions to the problem, including Maria Westerbos’ opinion on this topic.

Washing clothes releases thousands of microplastic particles into environment, study shows (27 September 2016)

More than 700,000 microscopic fibres could be released into waste water during each use of a domestic washing machine, with many of them likely to pass through sewage treatment and into the environment, according to new research by Plymouth University.

Single clothes wash may release 700,000 microplastic fibres, study finds (27 September 2016)

2365A team at Plymouth University in the UK spent 12 months analyzing what happened when a number of synthetic materials were washed at different temperatures in domestic washing machines, using different combinations of detergents, to quantify the microfibers shed.

Fashion And Beauty: Polluting Our Oceans (20 September 2016)

mermaids-thumbnailSamantha Leigh from The Huffington Post writes about microbeads and microfibers and where they come from and the effects in the environment. Also, she highlights the Mermaids video and a list of tips for consumers.

The problem with polar fleece: it’s in the ocean, it’s in sea creatures, it’s on our plates (17 August 2016)

Mrs. Homegrown from RootSimple addresses the microfiber issue and environmental organizations that are working to solve it. They also showed the Life+ Mermaids Striptease video.

Sopa plástica (1 August 2016)

The Portuguese magazine Pagina22 talks about the “plastic soup” and the evidence that the Mermaids project provided in terms of the amount of microfibers released in the oceans. The journalist Fábio Rodrigues quoted Maria Westerbos, director of the Plastic Soup Foundation.

Clothing Microfibers are Poising Marine Life, and We’re Next (23 June 2016)

5200EcoSalon talks about Patagonia’s new study on microfiber release and addresses the fact that companies need to change how they create clothing and technology needs to keep up in order to solve the proble, They also quote the preliminary results from the Mermaids research.

The plastic fibers in your clothes are piling up in nature, and may end up in your gut (22 June 2016)

Fusion writes about Patagonia’s new study about microfiber release and refers to the Mermaids Striptease video for tips for consumers on how to reduce the microfibers they release during laundry washing.

How your clothes are poisoning our oceans and food supply (20 June 2016)

Leah Messinger from The Guardian addresses the microfiber problem by talking about Patagonia’s new study but also quotes Maria Westerbos, director of the Plastic Soup Foundation, about Mermaids’ preliminary data and a possible solution to the issue.

Patagonia’s New Study Finds Fleece Jackets Are a Serious Pollutant (20 June 2016)

washing-machine-patagonia-clothes_hOutside Online refers to Patagonia’s new study about microfiber release and compares it to other researches such as Mark A. Browne or Mermaids Life+. They also highlight the tips to reduce microfiber release from the Mermaids website and the “Mermaids Striptease” video.

Das Mikroplastik, das aus der Waschmaschine kommt (25 May 2016)
Kai Pohlmann, from the German organization Deutsche Meeresstiftung, talks about microplastics, the Mermaids project and what the consumer can do to reduce the amount of microfibers they release during laundry processes.

Modeweetje: waarom teveel wassen van kleding niet goed is (28 April 2016)

Textilia talks about the partnership between G-Star RAW and Plastic Soup Foundation and quotes Maria Westerbos about the importance of solving the problem. It also links to the Mermaids project.

G-Star in actie tegen oceaanvervuiling door microvezels (28 April 2016)

Duurzaam Bedrijfsleven links to the Mermaids research to explain the preliminary results of the project and the cooperation between G-Star RAW and Plastic Soup Foundation.

Calls For Fashion Industsry to Acto on Microfibres (27 April 2016)

Edward Perchard talks about the partnership between Plastic Soup Foundation and G-Star to address plastic microfibres in water. Mermaids Life+ program provides with the necessary data to launch the Ocean Clean Wash campaign.

Microvezels uit wasmachines maken ‘plastic soep’ van oceaan (27 April 2016)

The Belgian De Standaard presents the preliminary results from the Mermaids project to explain the new Ocean Clean Wash campaign and the partnership between G-Star RAW and Plastic Soup Foundation.

G-Star partners with ocean waste NGO (27 April 2016)

Brett Mathews from Ecotextile News talks about the partnership between G-Star RAW and Plastic Soup Foundation to solve the microfiber problem.

Cute outfit. Did you know it’s bad for the environment? (22 April 2016)

Image: Michelle Taylor

Image: Michelle Taylor

These article at MSN.com addresses the waste that it’s created by unwanted clothes: 86% of clothes end up in landfills. It also talks about the fiber release and the work the Plastic Soup Foundation is doing to solve this issue. and some of the advice that the Mermaids program has given to consumers.

Cuidado con lo que metes en la lavadora (17 February 2016)

The Spanish blog La cuarta R, reviews the problem of plastic pollution due to the shedding of microfibers from washing processes and gives some tips to the consumers.

Read the post here.

The end of microplastics (21 August 2015)

Photo: Laszlo Kubinyi

Photo: Laszlo Kubinyi

Michael Lerner, from the website Blouin News, reviews the fight against microplastics, specifically microbeads in cosmetics and microfibers from washing processes. He emphasizes the Life+ Mermaids project as a basic actor in this issue.

Read the full article here.

Kleine en grote wasjes dragen bij aan de plastic soep (7 August 2015)

Every time we do the laundry we contribute to “plastic soup” in the oceans. This TV piece by RTL Nieuws explains the problem and the work by the Plastic Soup Foundation in the Mermaids project.

The Invisible Nightmare in Your Fleece (30 July 2015)

The magazine Outside published an article about the release of microfibers coming out of washing machines. Mary Catherine O’Connor reviews the research that has been made about this issue and highlights the Life+ Mermaids program as an important factor in the mission of reducing microfiber shedding by 70 percent.

5 Ways To Support Sea Change for World Oceans Day (1 June 2016)

wasing machine

Photo: NOW Toronto

Among all the things consumers can do to support sea change, not buying and washing synthetic clothes is an easy one. Microfibers from synthetic clothes are polluting the oceans and NOW Toronto gives the consumers tips of what they can do to release less microfibers during laundry processes.

Read the article here.

“Making clothes and shoes from ‘plastic soup’ is not a solution” (1 June 2015)

Maria Westerbos of Plastic Soup Foundation is quoted in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment “Making clothes and shoes from ‘plastic soup’ is not a solution” in response to Adidas’ initiative (with the group Parley for the Oceans) to use sea based plastics for their clothing and shoes.

Read the whole article by Jen Fela.
The review of the article also appeared on Dispatches.

Interview for TouchVisionTV Chicago

Harmen Spek, head of innovations of the Plastic Soup Lab, was interviewed by TouchVisionTV Chicago about companies looking to ocean debris as a resource to make sustainable clothing.

Read the full interview here.

Interview for “Il Sole 24 ore” (6 March 2015)

An interview on the LIFE+ Mermaids project was published on “Il Sole 24 ore” on the 6th March 2015.

Read the article here.

The Invisible Nightmare in Your Fleece – July 30th, 2015
The magazine Outside published an article about the release of microfibres coming out of washing machines. Mary Catherine O’Connor reviews the research that has been made about this issue and highlights the Life+ Mermaids program as an important actor in the mission of reducing microfiber shedding by 70 percent.

Read the article here.

The end of microplastics – August 21st, 2015

Photo: Laszlo Kubinyi

Photo: Laszlo Kubinyi

Michael Lerner, from the website Blouin News, reviews the fight against microplastics, specifically microbeads in cosmetics and microfibres from washing processes. He emphasizes the Life+ Mermaids project as a basic actor in this issue.

Read the full article here.

Kleine en grote wasjes dragen bij aan de plastic soep – August 7th, 2015
The Dutch TV channel RTL interviewed Maria Westerbos from the Plastic Soup Foundation about the problem of microplastics, both microbeads and microfibres coming out of washing machines.

Watch the news item (in Dutch) here.